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Nick Goss

Green Lanes

Green Lanes. It sounds pastoral, nostalgic, faintly utopian – like some network of ancient drovers’ tracks and holloways that endures furtively in a pocket of deep England. But Green Lanes could hardly be further from such a place: it is a drawn-out urban thoroughfare, which slices for miles through the suburbs of north London, abutted by old retail parades, housing estates and supermarkets, by ranks of semi-detached houses and parks that renounced their claims to rural retreat well over a century ago.

24 September 2020

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Christof Mascher

Presence Above All

Christof Mascher’s Street turns river, a 2015 painting in oil on board, is an urban nocturne washed with the pale purply blue that belongs only to a clear night beneath a big moon. Gas streetlamps set cream-coloured orbs on either side of the scene, repoussoir glass gems from a European city of the 1820s. A boulevard carves through the landscape, parcelling it up. The painting is tight, everything in its proper place.

7 September 2020

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Gareth Cadwallader

Painting in the world, around the world

Shortly after the opening of Half-Lowered Eyelids, his first solo exhibition at Josh Lilley in January 2019, Gareth Cadwallader left his South London home to paint in the world. A painter with a meticulous, private methodology in art and life, the following images are all that we know about the genesis of the three works ultimately presented at Art Basel Miami Beach in December of that year.

25 August 2020

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Nicholas Hatfull

Sky and vapour

Josh Lilley first showed Nicholas Hatfull's iPad sky drawings — unique archival pigment prints on Somerset paper, modest but glowing — in the 2019 group show of painters' preparatory works Preparing for What. A year later we are proud to introduce and offer the first large oils derived from this daily digital practice.

25 August 2020

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Derek Fordjour

SHELTER

SHELTER, Derek Fordjour's 2020 solo exhibition at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, was both a compact survey of the artist's recent work and a site-specific installation that placed the viewer in a position of temporary safety from a heavy storm.

25 August 2020

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Ryan Mosley

What People Do

A year ago, Ryan Mosley was approached by the Contemporary Art Society, a heritage charity and consultancy that acquires British artworks for public display around the nation, to submit a proposal for the lobby of a skyscraper growing in London. This skyscraper, 22 Bishopsgate, would be second in size, nationwide, to Renzo Piano’s Shard, and would dwarf the landmarks of the city’s colossus-choked financial center. Paintings, thought this painter of paintings, would not fit for this space.

25 August 2020

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Ian Davis

Cruise Ship

Initiated in late 2019 and finished in June 2020, Ian Davis’ Cruise Ship evolved through a changing global reality, and the artist's iconic figures in matching clothes never arrived, never populated the scene. The cruise ship became a ghost ship — its trajectory, its past and its future, elusive. The rippling wake signals motion, but its unclear who is steering.

24 August 2020

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Nicholas Hatfull

An Autumn Afternoon

There’s an alley that reappears in Nicholas Hatfull’s recent paintings. It is an alley from An Autumn Afternoon (1962), Yasujirō Ozu’s final film.

24 August 2020

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Kathleen Ryan

The Journey of Bad Melon (Party Girl)

Altogether more moist and pulpy than the citrus fruits with which the series debuted at Josh Lilley in October 2018, the Bad Melon works conjure another tangible, tactile aspect of ‘badness’.

24 August 2020

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Kathleen Ryan

Ghost Palm

Kathleen Ryan’s Ghost Palm was commissioned in 2019 for the second edition of the biennial Desert X, an exhibition of site-responsive artworks in Southern California’s Coachella valley in the spring of 2019. A lifesize rendering of the Washingtonia filifera (desert palm) in steel, plastics and glass, Ghost Palm sat along the San Andreas Fault, the meeting point of two tectonic plates.

24 August 2020

Installation view of Street Turns River at Josh Lilley, presenting Christof Mascher
Installation view of Street Turns River at Josh Lilley, presenting Christof Mascher
Installation view of Street Turns River at Josh Lilley, presenting Christof Mascher
Installation view of Street Turns River at Josh Lilley, presenting Christof Mascher
Installation view of Street Turns River at Josh Lilley, presenting Christof Mascher
Installation view of Street Turns River at Josh Lilley, presenting Christof Mascher
Installation view of Street Turns River at Josh Lilley, presenting Christof Mascher
Installation view of Street Turns River at Josh Lilley, presenting Christof Mascher

Artworks

Walden by Christof Mascher, 2015
North Bend by Christof Mascher, 2015
Street turns river by Christof Mascher, 2015
Loom by Christof Mascher, 2015
Dino rug by Christof Mascher, 2015
Douglas fir by Christof Mascher, 2015
Westbound, by Christof Mascher, 2015
Introverted-lambdog-ant-eater by Christof Mascher, 2015
Northern light by Christof Mascher, 2015
Night by Christof Mascher, 2015
Friends by Christof Mascher, 2015
Pinup II by Christof Mascher, 2015
Fire walk with me by Christof Mascher, 2015
Pool I by Christof Mascher, 2015
Pinup III by Christof Mascher, 2015
You know, this is — excuse me — a damn fine cup of coffee! by Christof Mascher, 2015
Yes by Christof Mascher, 2015
Night Is Lovers by Christof Mascher, 2015
House of many windows by Christof Mascher, 2015

Christof Mascher

Street Turns River

20 November 2015 – 14 January 2016

It was fun to make huge paintings in the middle of the night on subway cars, and the feeling of driving past my works the next day still has no equivalent. Adrenaline, the sensation of being fully awake, allows complete focus on an activity. I consider drawing and painting as a way to think, and the content in my work has for a long time been a vessel, a means to use colors, layers and shapes with total certainty in a narrative way.

An idea or a found image appears as a starting point but I never really know what happens after that. The mind speaks and sings, and all I want to do is compose, combining patterns, ornaments and objects in new relations. Mood or flow makes it possible for me to reach the content I want. Its not mania so much as trance, a channeling. No expectations need be fulfilled, though I am constantly searching for beauty. Beauty is a hidden villa, abandoned for 100 years and accidently rediscovered. Beauty is a small pond in a forest, a canoe trip at four in the morning on a river in northern Sweden.

I cannot plan, and there are countless ways to reach a result. In Pinup III, for example, I used pure color pigments for the first time, pouring them on a board primed with a medium that makes them dry immediately on the surface. Before then, it took weeks to dry. The watercolor works are stretched on board with paper glue so that they can sustain litres of water without rippling. It is an amazing experience to wake up and see what has happened to a paper work overnight. Indian ink with a little shellac finish and pigment-heavy crayons have their own language.

My figurative elements are slowly fading into a rug of short stories fusing past and future. Sometimes a memory appears in bright detail, as when a friend tagged a mirrored surface only for that surface to open and reveal itself as a subway security room. He was yanked through. This happens.

Christof Mascher (b. 1979, Hannover, Germany) lives and works in Germany. Mascher has presented two prior solo exhibitions at Josh Lilley alongside solo institutional exhibitions at the Städtische Galerie Wolfsburg, Germany; California Lutheran University, USA; and Kunsthalle Emden, Germany.