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Nick Goss

Green Lanes

Green Lanes. It sounds pastoral, nostalgic, faintly utopian – like some network of ancient drovers’ tracks and holloways that endures furtively in a pocket of deep England. But Green Lanes could hardly be further from such a place: it is a drawn-out urban thoroughfare, which slices for miles through the suburbs of north London, abutted by old retail parades, housing estates and supermarkets, by ranks of semi-detached houses and parks that renounced their claims to rural retreat well over a century ago.

24 September 2020

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Christof Mascher

Presence Above All

Christof Mascher’s Street turns river, a 2015 painting in oil on board, is an urban nocturne washed with the pale purply blue that belongs only to a clear night beneath a big moon. Gas streetlamps set cream-coloured orbs on either side of the scene, repoussoir glass gems from a European city of the 1820s. A boulevard carves through the landscape, parcelling it up. The painting is tight, everything in its proper place.

7 September 2020

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Gareth Cadwallader

Painting in the world, around the world

Shortly after the opening of Half-Lowered Eyelids, his first solo exhibition at Josh Lilley in January 2019, Gareth Cadwallader left his South London home to paint in the world. A painter with a meticulous, private methodology in art and life, the following images are all that we know about the genesis of the three works ultimately presented at Art Basel Miami Beach in December of that year.

25 August 2020

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Nicholas Hatfull

Sky and vapour

Josh Lilley first showed Nicholas Hatfull's iPad sky drawings — unique archival pigment prints on Somerset paper, modest but glowing — in the 2019 group show of painters' preparatory works Preparing for What. A year later we are proud to introduce and offer the first large oils derived from this daily digital practice.

25 August 2020

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Derek Fordjour

SHELTER

SHELTER, Derek Fordjour's 2020 solo exhibition at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, was both a compact survey of the artist's recent work and a site-specific installation that placed the viewer in a position of temporary safety from a heavy storm.

25 August 2020

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Ryan Mosley

What People Do

A year ago, Ryan Mosley was approached by the Contemporary Art Society, a heritage charity and consultancy that acquires British artworks for public display around the nation, to submit a proposal for the lobby of a skyscraper growing in London. This skyscraper, 22 Bishopsgate, would be second in size, nationwide, to Renzo Piano’s Shard, and would dwarf the landmarks of the city’s colossus-choked financial center. Paintings, thought this painter of paintings, would not fit for this space.

25 August 2020

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Ian Davis

Cruise Ship

Initiated in late 2019 and finished in June 2020, Ian Davis’ Cruise Ship evolved through a changing global reality, and the artist's iconic figures in matching clothes never arrived, never populated the scene. The cruise ship became a ghost ship — its trajectory, its past and its future, elusive. The rippling wake signals motion, but its unclear who is steering.

24 August 2020

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Nicholas Hatfull

An Autumn Afternoon

There’s an alley that reappears in Nicholas Hatfull’s recent paintings. It is an alley from An Autumn Afternoon (1962), Yasujirō Ozu’s final film.

24 August 2020

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Kathleen Ryan

The Journey of Bad Melon (Party Girl)

Altogether more moist and pulpy than the citrus fruits with which the series debuted at Josh Lilley in October 2018, the Bad Melon works conjure another tangible, tactile aspect of ‘badness’.

24 August 2020

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Kathleen Ryan

Ghost Palm

Kathleen Ryan’s Ghost Palm was commissioned in 2019 for the second edition of the biennial Desert X, an exhibition of site-responsive artworks in Southern California’s Coachella valley in the spring of 2019. A lifesize rendering of the Washingtonia filifera (desert palm) in steel, plastics and glass, Ghost Palm sat along the San Andreas Fault, the meeting point of two tectonic plates.

24 August 2020

Installation view of Seven Sculptures at Sunset at Josh Lilley, presenting Kathleen Ryan
Installation view of Seven Sculptures at Sunset at Josh Lilley, presenting Kathleen Ryan
Installation view of Seven Sculptures at Sunset at Josh Lilley, presenting Kathleen Ryan
Installation view of Seven Sculptures at Sunset at Josh Lilley, presenting Kathleen Ryan
Installation view of Seven Sculptures at Sunset at Josh Lilley, presenting Kathleen Ryan
Installation view of Seven Sculptures at Sunset at Josh Lilley, presenting Kathleen Ryan
Installation view of Seven Sculptures at Sunset at Josh Lilley, presenting Kathleen Ryan
Installation view of Seven Sculptures at Sunset at Josh Lilley, presenting Kathleen Ryan
Installation view of Seven Sculptures at Sunset at Josh Lilley, presenting Kathleen Ryan
Installation view of Seven Sculptures at Sunset at Josh Lilley, presenting Kathleen Ryan
Installation view of Seven Sculptures at Sunset at Josh Lilley, presenting Kathleen Ryan
Installation view of Seven Sculptures at Sunset at Josh Lilley, presenting Kathleen Ryan

Artworks

Embrace by Kathleen Ryan, 2018
Receiver by Kathleen Ryan, 2018
Fool's Mold by Kathleen Ryan, 2018
Sour Pearls by Kathleen Ryan, 2018
Semi-Precious Bone by Kathleen Ryan, 2018
Satellite in Repose by Kathleen Ryan, 2018
Fountain of Youth by Kathleen Ryan, 2018

Kathleen Ryan

Seven Sculptures at Sunset

4 October – 1 December 2018

Josh Lilley is pleased to present Seven Sculptures at Sunset, American artist Kathleen Ryan's second exhibition at the gallery.

Ivy vines creep around a block of stone. 84 parrots perch on the recumbent frame of a giant satellite dish, the sort that could collect hundreds of exotic stations in the 1980s. Three lemons in different stages of decay describe the nuanced culture of mould. A hanging basket of industrial iron callipers cradles a cornucopia of fruit. Ryan creates sculpture in the palette of the American vernacular, drawing on trinkets and souvenirs, hobbies and leisure, the rudimentary phenomena of nature, or the home accoutrements that serve as modest markers of status. Her subjects are the stuff of consumerism, the stuff people put around themselves and understand. We know these objects, what they are and what they do, and there is comfort in familiarity: it brings inanimate things near to us, and makes them part of us. This is the essence of the everyday object, dissolving into our lives.

But these objects do not dissolve. In wet clay, the parrots are squeezed into being, then cooked and killed, glazed forever. They still bear fingerprints, though. Gem, pearl and bone beads accumulate on the surfaces of the lemons like cells dividing. The bronze threads and jade leaves of ivy dance around the granite blocks heavy geometric mass. The parabola of the satellite dish wants to receive the sky, but the birds just want to sit on it. Ryan pulls apart and reassembles her subjects and the narratives they bear, contrasting sensual materials with no-nonsense units of industry, explosion with containment, speed with precision, elegance with kitsch, and gravity with weightlessness. She compromises her subjects by creating tension in the identity and the will of their materials. They are not familiar, because they will not settle down.

The works in this exhibition are elegiac, strong memento mori drawn from centuries of art history as much as the Tuesday misery of finding citrus going bad. Jewel-encrusted fruit call to reliquaries; the creeping vines tell the gravestone how much time has passed. The mouldy lemons are returning to the earth, from where they came. Death is something to consider. And yet, arrested in the amber between day and night, there is nothing to mourn.

Kathleen Ryan (b. 1984, Santa Monica) holds an MFA from the University of California, Los Angeles. She has presented solo exhibitions at Cc Foundation & Art Centre, Shanghai; Arsenal, New York; Josh Lilley, London; and Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles. In 2017 she received the commission from the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, for its annual project in the iconic Theseus Temple, and she will be the subject of a solo exhibition at the MIT List Visual Arts Center in February 2019. Group exhibitions include Simon Lee, Andrew Kreps and Tanya Bonakdar, New York; The Pit and Various Small Fires, Los Angeles; and many others. Ryan is participating in Frieze Sculpture 2018 with Josh Lilley in Regents Park, running concurrently with the opening of this exhibition.