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Nick Goss

Green Lanes

Green Lanes. It sounds pastoral, nostalgic, faintly utopian – like some network of ancient drovers’ tracks and holloways that endures furtively in a pocket of deep England. But Green Lanes could hardly be further from such a place: it is a drawn-out urban thoroughfare, which slices for miles through the suburbs of north London, abutted by old retail parades, housing estates and supermarkets, by ranks of semi-detached houses and parks that renounced their claims to rural retreat well over a century ago.

24 September 2020

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Christof Mascher

Presence Above All

Christof Mascher’s Street turns river, a 2015 painting in oil on board, is an urban nocturne washed with the pale purply blue that belongs only to a clear night beneath a big moon. Gas streetlamps set cream-coloured orbs on either side of the scene, repoussoir glass gems from a European city of the 1820s. A boulevard carves through the landscape, parcelling it up. The painting is tight, everything in its proper place.

7 September 2020

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Gareth Cadwallader

Painting in the world, around the world

Shortly after the opening of Half-Lowered Eyelids, his first solo exhibition at Josh Lilley in January 2019, Gareth Cadwallader left his South London home to paint in the world. A painter with a meticulous, private methodology in art and life, the following images are all that we know about the genesis of the three works ultimately presented at Art Basel Miami Beach in December of that year.

25 August 2020

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Nicholas Hatfull

Sky and vapour

Josh Lilley first showed Nicholas Hatfull's iPad sky drawings — unique archival pigment prints on Somerset paper, modest but glowing — in the 2019 group show of painters' preparatory works Preparing for What. A year later we are proud to introduce and offer the first large oils derived from this daily digital practice.

25 August 2020

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Derek Fordjour

SHELTER

SHELTER, Derek Fordjour's 2020 solo exhibition at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis, was both a compact survey of the artist's recent work and a site-specific installation that placed the viewer in a position of temporary safety from a heavy storm.

25 August 2020

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Ryan Mosley

What People Do

A year ago, Ryan Mosley was approached by the Contemporary Art Society, a heritage charity and consultancy that acquires British artworks for public display around the nation, to submit a proposal for the lobby of a skyscraper growing in London. This skyscraper, 22 Bishopsgate, would be second in size, nationwide, to Renzo Piano’s Shard, and would dwarf the landmarks of the city’s colossus-choked financial center. Paintings, thought this painter of paintings, would not fit for this space.

25 August 2020

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Ian Davis

Cruise Ship

Initiated in late 2019 and finished in June 2020, Ian Davis’ Cruise Ship evolved through a changing global reality, and the artist's iconic figures in matching clothes never arrived, never populated the scene. The cruise ship became a ghost ship — its trajectory, its past and its future, elusive. The rippling wake signals motion, but its unclear who is steering.

24 August 2020

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Nicholas Hatfull

An Autumn Afternoon

There’s an alley that reappears in Nicholas Hatfull’s recent paintings. It is an alley from An Autumn Afternoon (1962), Yasujirō Ozu’s final film.

24 August 2020

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Kathleen Ryan

The Journey of Bad Melon (Party Girl)

Altogether more moist and pulpy than the citrus fruits with which the series debuted at Josh Lilley in October 2018, the Bad Melon works conjure another tangible, tactile aspect of ‘badness’.

24 August 2020

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Kathleen Ryan

Ghost Palm

Kathleen Ryan’s Ghost Palm was commissioned in 2019 for the second edition of the biennial Desert X, an exhibition of site-responsive artworks in Southern California’s Coachella valley in the spring of 2019. A lifesize rendering of the Washingtonia filifera (desert palm) in steel, plastics and glass, Ghost Palm sat along the San Andreas Fault, the meeting point of two tectonic plates.

24 August 2020

Installation view of Frieze New York at Josh Lilley, presenting Ryan Mosley
Installation view of Frieze New York at Josh Lilley, presenting Ryan Mosley

Artworks

The Coming of Time by Ryan Mosley, 2020
A King's Return by Ryan Mosley, 2020
The Passage, by Ryan Mosley, 2020
Shadows of Belshazzar by Ryan Mosley, 2020
A Natural Plateau by Ryan Mosley, 2020
Scholarly Voices by Ryan Mosley, 2020

Ryan Mosley

Frieze New York

5 – 14 May 2020

For the Frieze Viewing Room, Josh Lilley is proud to present six new works by British painter Ryan Mosley, including the debut of large-scale wall hangings.

The Ryan Mosley presentation at Frieze New York 2020 was conceived as an introduction and an evolution alike. It was to be Mosley’s first monographic US fair presentation since his 2011 solo booth with Alison Jacques at the Armory Show, and his first under the Josh Lilley canopy; it was the planned unveiling of the textile wall hangings, a body of work Mosley has been developing in private for the past 12 months; and it was a new approach to the artist’s oeuvre, honouring extensive discourse established over the past decade while looking at his work with fresh eyes.

The booth design comprised four large paintings, one per wall in an interior space with a narrow opening that implied a parallel reality. The outside walls were stages for the proclamation of two textile wall hangings, a new strand in the artist’s practice, appearing as banners for the passing public. The new paintings, from medium to large, span the range of group scenes for which Mosley is known — rites, pacts and leisure scenes for characters outside of space and time — in his signature scholarly, wide palette.

The paintings are a snapshot of a practice, picking up on the artist’s inclusion this spring in Radical Figures: Painting in the New Millennium at the Whitechapel Gallery, London, an important treatise exhibition on the global stakes of contemporary figuration told through ten painters, among them Cecily Brown, Daniel Richter, Tala Madani and Dana Schutz.

The wall hangings are an extension of a major commission for 22 Bishopsgate, the London skyscraper that will open this autumn, as the second largest structure in the country, with eight Mosley works in its lobby. The two works on display are the first and only works of this kind available to the public. Hand-cut, dyed and assembled through a laborious, many-step process, these new works shed light on the long-honed, hard-won processes — formal, manual and neural — behind Mosley’s compositions.

This is Josh Lilley’s first solo project with the artist, who has appeared in key gallery group shows over the past decade, including the opening exhibition in 2009, the 10th-anniversary show in 2019, and 2017’s A New Kitchen Sink, a group show treatise on British figurative painting in a moment of social change.

Ryan Mosley (b. 1980, Chesterfield, UK) has been the subject of multiple solo exhibitions at Alison Jacques, London; Tim Van Laere, Antwerp; and EIGEN + ART, Berlin and Leipzig. He will hold his first solo exhibition at Josh Lilley in 2021.